Shopping Canada Can Be A Historical Experience

shopping

Canada has many unique and intriguing products to tempt the avid shopper. For example, in the heritage shops found on Vancouver Island, many products can be seen which come from all parts of the world. British heritage is reflected in the specialty teas and coffees. You can purchase hand loomed woolen fabrics as well as tartans from the Scottish Isles. Beautiful and delicate examples of Irish lace can be found in many of the small specialty shops on the Island.

Other parts of Canada provide shoppers delights such as chocolates. In the eastern of the country, where the French influence is much stronger, one can find the delicate pastries and tortes that are so typical of France. The Quartier Petit Champlain, for example is a wonderful shopping district, which makes one wonder why malls exist when you could be shopping in the remarkable ambiance of the winter Carnival when the merchants prepare and display ice sculptures at the entry to their businesses. Chocolate is a big item, but you can also buy local art and wood carvings, fashion clothing worthy of the French label and other items which bring to mind the richness of the history and culture of the area.

The woodcarvings are a specialty of the area. You can actually watch the artists at work creating unique and beautiful pieces. These are also sold at street fairs and street markets held during certain times of the year. Local native artists who lend their own distinctive touches and style to items do many of the pieces for sale.

A unique shopping experience, which can be found in Quebec, is a medieval store. For those people who are into reenactments of scenes from medieval history, this shop is the place to visit. The beautiful swords displayed are not only detailed with fine artisanship, but are realistic historically too.

Another shopping experience in Quebec City is visiting the oldest grocery in North America. J. A. Moisan was founded in 1871 and features locally produced preserves and find cheeses, as well as a wide selection of food stuffs from around the world.

Of course, maple products seems to be always associated with Canada and there is no shortage of these in many of the shops and retail outlets found in the eastern provinces of Canada. You can also frequently find these products in smaller roadside stands and street markets but buying them at the source is a fun challenge that some shoppers find quite enjoyable.